Exceptional Values Of Millet As Healthy Food

Millets - The Futre Of Our Bread

Image Source - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Finger_millet_3_11-21-02.jpg
With the changing climatic conditions and rainfall pattern we need to shift our focus towards climate resilient crops. Millets are seen as an alternative to wheat and rice as they are not only climate resilient but also offers huge nutritional benefits. Millets are grown worldwide and we can see them as our future bread.

Millets are small-grained cereal grasses which are grown in almost every state and region.The most popular millets are Bajra (Pearl Millet), Jowar, Shorghum and Ragi.They are tiny in size and round in shape. Millets are specially known as climate change compliant crops as they can withstand extreme climatic conditions like heat ,erratic rainfall as contrary to wheat which is thermal sensitive crop and rice which needs heavy rainfall.

Millets are the oldest grains known to the mankind.The evidences of their culivation dates back to 3000 B.C. in Indus Valley Civilization. Millets are called as miracle grains for their high nutritional value. They are low water consuming crops, they need 25% less rainfall compared to sugarcane and banana farming and 30% less as that of rice cultivation. Hence with the changing climatic conditions and irregular rainfall pattern causing water crisis, millets can be seen as an alternative bread.

Benefits of Millets to human body:

1. 100 gram raw millets provide 378 calories.

2.

Millet is a rich source of protein, dietary fiber, vitamin B, iron , calcium, magnesium, zinc etc. 

3. Consuming millets provide protection against cardiac diseases and improves diabetes.

4. It lowers the level of bad cholesterol in your body.

5. It is an alkaline foodgrain and hence can be easily digested.

6. It prevents the onset of breast cancer .

7. It detoxifies the body and is found to be effective in lowering blood pressure.

8. It is extremely effective in curing digestion related problems. It offers great relief in constipation, excess gas, bloating and cramping.

9. It helps to optimize liver, kidney and immune system.

10. It also help in weight loss.

11. It helps in reapiring body cells and tissues.

12. Pearl Millet is especially given to lactating mother to increase the secretion of breast milk.

13. Ragi or Finger millet is called a wonder grain as it has the highest mineral and calcium content as compared to wholegrains.

14. Kodo Millet helps to regulate irregular menstural cycles in women.

Growing millets would help countries to solve the problem of food security. If they are provided to poor people, it will raise their nutritional standards and solve the issue of malnutrition in children.They can prove to be boon in the drought prone regions of the world. Millets can be grown in low quality soil and it is pest resistant so it offers less chance of crop failure and hence poor farmers can see them as a good source of income. 


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  • Marie-Writes  14-07-2017
    Now I feel encouraged to use the bag of millet in my kitchen cupboard. Thanks for reminding me it's worthwhile!
    reply 0
  • nbillett  31-03-2017
    i have never heard of millet. Thanks for sharing the information. this is really important to know. i hope as you said countries will look to implementing and growing produce such as these to assist with the global food crisis.
    reply 0
  • sweta  29-03-2017
    It is really good to increase the awareness regarding millets. This article has mentioned several benefits of the usage of millets, the old treasure. Millets are totally neglected crops. These kind of articles may help people to encourage the usage of millets in daily food.
    reply 0
  • lucib29  21-02-2017
    The research review describes numerous studies that found statistically significant evidence that the seven different additives cause measurable changes in tight junctions and/or cellular permeability. However, it’s important to note that the evidence presented is correlational and does not show a causal relationship. For example, one study observed that people with Crohn’s disease consume more processed carbohydrates than those without Crohn’s disease. Another study in Japan found that as sales of commercial emulsifiers increased, so did the incidence of Crohn’s disease.
    reply 0
  • lucib29  21-02-2017
    One possible way these additives may be contributing to the rise in autoimmune disease is in how they act on the “tight junctions” in the intestines. A tight junction occurs between epithelial cells when they form a sort of “cell blanket” that acts as a barrier to keep different substances in the body where they are supposed to be. When the tight junctions are damaged, intestinal permeability is increased which leads to the body’s immune system being exposed to antigens in the foreign material in the intestines.
    reply 0
  • lucib29  21-02-2017
    · Sugars – used widely in foods to enhance sweetness in everything from carbonated beverages to bread to pasta sauces · Salt – added to foods to promote flavor, freshness, texture, and appearance · Emulsifiers – ingredients like polysorbate 80, lecithin, carrageenan, polyglycerols, xanthan, and other “gums” are emulsifiers used to stabilize foods and extend the shelf-life · Organic solvents – these carbon-based solvents are sometimes used to extract specific constituents from plant products, such as those to make decaffeinated coffee or tea · Gluten – the major constituent in wheat, comprising 80% of the proteins
    reply 0
  • lucib29  21-02-2017
    · Sugars – used widely in foods to enhance sweetness in everything from carbonated beverages to bread to pasta sauces · Salt – added to foods to promote flavor, freshness, texture, and appearance · Emulsifiers – ingredients like polysorbate 80, lecithin, carrageenan, polyglycerols, xanthan, and other “gums” are emulsifiers used to stabilize foods and extend the shelf-life · Organic solvents – these carbon-based solvents are sometimes used to extract specific constituents from plant products, such as those to make decaffeinated coffee or tea · Gluten – the major constituent in wheat, comprising 80% of the proteins
    reply 0
  • lucib29  21-02-2017
    While many people following a gluten-free diet avoid convenience foods for fear of possible gluten exposure, research suggests that processed foods themselves may play a role in autoimmune diseases outside of simple manufacturing contamination. A 2015 article published in the journal Autoimmunity Reviews presents preliminary evidence that certain additives in processed foods may be contributing to the rise in autoimmune diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease.
    reply 0
  • lucib29  21-02-2017
    A gluten-free diet (GFD) is a diet that excludes gluten, a protein composite found in wheat, barley, rye, and all their species and hybrids (such as spelt, kamut, and triticale). The inclusion of oats in a gluten-free diet remains controversial. Avenin present in oats may also be toxic for coeliac people; its toxicity depends on the cultivar consumed. Furthermore, oats are frequently cross-contaminated with cereals containing gluten.
    reply 0